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 The Product 

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We all need to drink water to survive. How we obtain that water is another story. The New York Times stated that the average American consumer spends approximately $1,400 each year on plastic water bottles. If these consumers drank the same amount of water, but out of their kitchen faucet instead, they would have spent only $0.49 in the same year. This proves that it is a very attractive alternative for consumers to purchase a reusable water bottle. Financial benefits aside, more and more consumers are becoming aware of the environmental issues these plastic bottles pose. Many people looking to live a “greener” life have sought to purchase a reusable water bottle to remove the need to purchase non-biodegradable plastic bottles.


The reusable beverage containers currently on the market include glass, aluminum, and polycarbonate plastic bottles. Glass containers are very heavy and shatter when dropped from even a low height. Aluminum bottles can be quite expensive and, depending on their thickness, will dent fairly easily. Polycarbonate bottles, again depending on how they are made, chip, crack, and break when dropped. Additionally, none of these beverage containers are biodegradable.


Hemp Plastic Water Bottles will be a more durable, higher heat tolerable, 100% safe, and biodegradable alternative. What's even more interesting is that this product will have a negative carbon footprint. How many products can say that? The carbon taken in by the plant during its life offsets the carbon produced by the machines making the bottle.


This product has the ability to change the world. We chose a reusable water bottle because it is a simplistic product that can be utilized every day of our lives. We all need to drink water to survive, and purchasing bottled water is slowly becoming unacceptable, not to mention detrimental to our health. This product can curb our world plastic consumption, and better our planet in the process.

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